Socialism and Canadian Policies

Topics: Socialism, Poverty, Poverty threshold Pages: 3 (705 words) Published: October 14, 2013
Socialism and Canadian Policies

Socialism is a political ideology that falls on the left wing of the political spectrum. Socialism was around for many centuries but was not popular until the nineteenth century (Heywood, 1997). The goal was to eliminate capitalism and replace it with common ownership (Heywood, 1997). Socialism is more of an umbrella ideology, and has many different variations. Modern socialism is one of the newest variations. This ideology has become very popular and is used in many different countries like Canada, Germany, Sweden and Australia. Although Canada is run under a conservative party it still follows some of the principles and elements of socialism.

Canada is looked at as a socialist country, because of the social programs that benefit the nation as a whole. Even though the principals and values of socialism are taken into consideration when policies are being made, not all of Canada’s policies follow those values. Child poverty is a vast problem in Canada today. Canada’s child poverty rate is at 15.1% (“Child Poverty” 2013), this number is increasingly high considering how industrialized Canada is as a whole. In Canada there are many support systems that are offered to reduce the poverty rate such as welfare and food banks (“End Poverty in Canada” 2010). Other socialist countries have managed to keep their poverty rates lower by having better child care systems (Monsebraaten, 2013). Canada offers some support when it comes to child care but it has a potential to be more affective. Canada’s approach to support families is subsidized child care. This paper argues that Canada’s subsidized child care is not doing enough to help families and children living in poverty.

Canada’s provinces all have different forms of subsidized childcare; in Ontario specifically you must be eligible to receive this benefit. It is usually based on the family’s income, if the youth is already in child care, and whether or not they are in...

Cited: "Child Poverty." The Conference Board of Canada (blog), January , 2013. http://www.cigionline.org/articles/2009/03/canada-and-caricom-third-way-trade (accessed September 23, 2013).
Earles, Kimberly. "Childcare and Parental leave in Sweden." working paper., York University, 2008. http://www.fondazionefeltrinelli.it/dm_0/FF/FeltrinelliCmsPortale/0386.pdf.
"End Poverty In Canada." Make Poverty History (blog), http://www.makepovertyhistory.ca/learn/issues/end-poverty-in-canada (accessed September 23, 2013).
Heywood, Andrew. Politics. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 1997.
Monsebraaten, Laurie. "Child Poverty: Mothercraft honours Campaign 2000 's Laurel Rothman." The Star, June 17, 2013. http://www.thestar.com/news/gta/2013/06/17/child_poverty_mothercraft_honours_campaign_2000s_laurel_rothman.html (accessed September 23, 2013).
"Paying for child care." Ontario Ministry of Education (blog), http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/childcare/paying.html
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